The Elder Columns, Part 3 – The Results of the Survey (Preliminary Findings)


The Elder Columns, Part III


The Results of the Survey
Preliminary Findings


Jaap Hollander, Lucas Derks, Bruce Grimley and Lisa de Rijk 

2018



Taraaah! here is the answer to ‘What is NLP?’
Maybe not the final, everlasting answer, but certainly the most authoritative answer so far.

In the Elder Columns Part I and Part II we described the arguments for defining NLP through voting and the NLP Leadership Summit group as an expert group suitable for voting. We also described the meticulous construction of ‘The List’ (the questionnaire) listing elements to vote on. You will find the whole story in these two articles: The Elder Columns Part 1 (Describing our justification for the voting process) and The Elder Columns Part 2 (Discussing the many contributions from the LS community and how they influenced the list).

The panel
The panel we ended up with had a remarkable level of NLP-expertise
All Leadership Summit members were invited to vote and 59 members did. The could vote 'Is part of NLP'/'I don't know'/'Is not part of NLP'.


Together they represent a remarkable amount of NLP-expertise. Between them, they have taught NLP for 1363 years and they have written 231 books on NLP. To our knowledge, never in the history of NLP has a group of this size, with this amount of NLP-expertise been asked to say what is NLP is and what is not.

The Delphi Method
We had been working according to the Delphi method.
As it turns out, we have been using the Delphi Method, which has these characteristics:

  1. It uses a group of participants (known as ‘panellists’) specially selected for their particular expertise on a topic.
  2. It is often conducted across a series of two or more sequential questionnaires known as ‘rounds’. It employs an initial ‘idea generation’ stage, in which panellists are asked to identify the range of salient issues.
  3. It collates ideas from Round 1 to construct the survey instrument distributed in subsequent rounds.
  4. It has an evaluation phase (third or further rounds) where panellists are provided with the panel’s responses and asked to re-evaluate their original responses.
  5. It is interested in the formation or exploration of consensus, often defined as the number of panellists agreeing with each other on questionnaire items.
  6. It is particularly useful in areas of limited research, since survey instruments and ideas are generated from a knowledgeable participant pool and it is suited to explore areas where controversy, debate or a lack of clarity exist.

As you can see from our first two articles, except for item 4, our process has adhered to the Delphi method.


Calculation

How did we calculate the results?
In our calculation, we simply used 70% yes-responses (“This is part of NLP”) as a cut off point. Within this area, we distinguished 90% and up. 


  • So the 2018 NLP Leadership Summit answer to ‘What is NLP’ is: the elements scoring 70% or more in the list below. 
  • You might say that everything scoring 90% and above is core NLP. These are set bold in the list below. In the original tables these items were given a yellow color, hence the name 'Yellow List'.
  • There are a few elements that are clearly voted as not NLP, like deep tissue massage. We took a 20% cut off for those and they are set to red in the list.
  • Elements scoring higher than 20%, but below 70% are coloured grey


We also calculated another list where the number of no-votes (“This is not part of NLP”) was subtracted from the number of yes-votes (“This is part of NLP”). If we used a 85% cut off with this formula, we were left mostly with NLP as it was in 1980.


Please note:

In this list, we show only the titles of the elements. For descriptions of the elements, please see the Elder Columns article Part 2.



Category 1A - Premises about Experience


The map is not the territory.

100

Life and mind are systemic processes.

90

Experience can be reduced to sensory elements (VAKOG).

88

Structure is more important than content.

92

The mind is a feed-forward system that predicts the future.

66



Category 1B - Premises about Communication and Change


The meaning of communication is the response elicited.

98

People have the resources for the changes they desire.

97

The system with the greatest flexibility survives.

88

If what you are doing does not work, it is useful to do something else.

97

Resistance is a signal of insufficient rapport.

86

There is no failure, only feedback.

98

All behaviour has a positive intention.

97

People make the best choices available to them.

98

If one can do it, others can learn to do it.

97

Submodalities determine the effect of an experience.

97



Category 2A - Distinctions


Sensory Modalities

100

Submodalities

100

Association versus Dissociation

100

Focus Outside versus Focus Inside

95

Analog versus Digital

93

Presupposition versus Explicit Statement versus Implication

78

Sensory experience versus Categorisation (Complex Equivalence)

90

Elements of the Structure of Subjective Experience

97

Neuro-Logical Levels

85

Meta Programs

92

Separating versus Joining

46

Graves Drives

3

Core States

68

Meta States

69



Category 2B - Attitude


Sponsoring Attitude

61

Modelling Orientation

97

COACH State

44



Category 2C - Model of Change


TOTE Model for Goal Directed Change

98

Well-Formed Outcomes

100

Utilization

97

SCORE Model for Choosing or Designing Interventions

83



Category 3A - Skills


Anchoring

98

As-if Frame

100

Calibrating Internal States and Processes

100

Clean Language

32

Double Induction

59

Ecological check

98

Eye Accessing Cues, Detecting and Working with

100

LAB Profile

63

Leading, verbal and nonverbal

95

Meta Model Questions

100

Milton Model Language Patterns

100

MindSonar MetaProfile Analysis

24

Modelling

100

Rapport (Mirroring/Pacing)

100

Stacking Realities

83

Strategies

100

Time Lines, Working with

98

Verbal Reframing

100



Category 3B - Techniques


Criteria for NLP Techniques

76

Aligning Neuro-Logical Levels Format

85

Aligning Perceptual Positions

92

Auditory Tempo Shift to change strong feelings

80

Bateson Strategy

41

Belief Audit for identifying limiting beliefs

75

Belief Outframing

73

Building Belief Bridges

46

Change Personal History

98

Changing a Strategy

98

Circle of Excellence

97

Co-Dependence Format

24

Collapsing Anchors

98

Collective Intelligence Techniques

25

Compulsion Blow Out

86

Core Finding Engine for identifying limiting beliefs

31

Core Transformation

76

Deep Tissue Massage

2

Disney Strategy

85

Dynamic Spin Release

25

Engaging the Body's Natural Processes of Healing Format

37

Eliciting a Resource, Using Communicating with the Future Self

93

Eliciting a Resource, Using a Reference Experience

97

Eliciting a Resource, Using Physiology

93

Eliciting a Resource, Using a Role Model

97

Family Constellations

5

Forgiveness Model

47

Future Pacing - Adapting a change to future contexts

100

Generative Collaboration Techniques

32

Generative Change Format

51

Godiva Chocolate Pattern

59

Grief Resolution, Shame Resolution, Guilt Resolution, Anger/Forgiveness process

73

Hero’s Journey Format

29

I-Wonder-How Technique for Generating Practical New Ideas

39

Imperative Self Format

32

Inner Child Work

22

Integrating Archetypal Energies

19

Integrating Conflicting Beliefs Format

78

mBIT - Multiple Brain Integration Techniques

5

Meta Mirror Format

68

Metaphor for inducing change

92

Negotiating Between Parts

98

New Behaviour Generator

97

Operating Metaphor

73

Provocative Change Techniques - Modelled from Frank Farrelly

36

Reimprinting Format

97

Resonance Pattern

34

Shifting the Importance of Criteria

86

Six Step Reframing

100

Social Panorama Techniques

36

Spinning Feelings to change strong feelings

54

Swish Pattern

98

Symbolic Modelling

42

Timeline Reframing Format

80

Transforming Negative Self-Talk Protocol

64

Trauma Process using V-K Dissociation

98

V-K Squash

95

Wholeness Process

37










The Elder Columns, Part III


The Results of the Survey
Preliminary Findings


Jaap Hollander, Lucas Derks, Bruce Grimley and Lisa de Rijk 

2018



Taraaah! here is the answer to ‘What is NLP?’
Maybe not the final, everlasting answer, but certainly the most authoritative answer so far.

In the Elder Columns Part I and Part II we described the arguments for defining NLP through voting and the NLP Leadership Summit group as an expert group suitable for voting. We also described the meticulous construction of ‘The List’ (the questionnaire) listing elements to vote on. You will find the whole story in these two articles: The Elder Columns Part 1 (Describing our justification for the voting process) and The Elder Columns Part 2 (Discussing the many contributions from the LS community and how they influenced the list).

The panel
The panel we ended up with had a remarkable level of NLP-expertise
All Leadership Summit members were invited to vote and 59 members did. The could vote 'Is part of NLP'/'I don't know'/'Is not part of NLP'.


Together they represent a remarkable amount of NLP-expertise. Between them, they have taught NLP for 1363 years and they have written 231 books on NLP. To our knowledge, never in the history of NLP has a group of this size, with this amount of NLP-expertise been asked to say what is NLP is and what is not.

The Delphi Method
We had been working according to the Delphi method.
As it turns out, we have been using the Delphi Method, which has these characteristics:

  1. It uses a group of participants (known as ‘panellists’) specially selected for their particular expertise on a topic.
  2. It is often conducted across a series of two or more sequential questionnaires known as ‘rounds’. It employs an initial ‘idea generation’ stage, in which panellists are asked to identify the range of salient issues.
  3. It collates ideas from Round 1 to construct the survey instrument distributed in subsequent rounds.
  4. It has an evaluation phase (third or further rounds) where panellists are provided with the panel’s responses and asked to re-evaluate their original responses.
  5. It is interested in the formation or exploration of consensus, often defined as the number of panellists agreeing with each other on questionnaire items.
  6. It is particularly useful in areas of limited research, since survey instruments and ideas are generated from a knowledgeable participant pool and it is suited to explore areas where controversy, debate or a lack of clarity exist.

As you can see from our first two articles, except for item 4, our process has adhered to the Delphi method.


Calculation

How did we calculate the results?
In our calculation, we simply used 70% yes-responses (“This is part of NLP”) as a cut off point. Within this area, we distinguished 90% and up. 


  • So the 2018 NLP Leadership Summit answer to ‘What is NLP’ is: the elements scoring 70% or more in the list below. 
  • You might say that everything scoring 90% and above is core NLP. These are set bold in the list below. In the original tables these items were given a yellow color, hence the name 'Yellow List'.
  • There are a few elements that are clearly voted as not NLP, like deep tissue massage. We took a 20% cut off for those and they are set to red in the list.
  • Elements scoring higher than 20%, but below 70% are coloured grey


We also calculated another list where the number of no-votes (“This is not part of NLP”) was subtracted from the number of yes-votes (“This is part of NLP”). If we used a 85% cut off with this formula, we were left mostly with NLP as it was in 1980.


Please note:

In this list, we show only the titles of the elements. For descriptions of the elements, please see the Elder Columns article Part 2.



Category 1A - Premises about Experience


The map is not the territory.

100

Life and mind are systemic processes.

90

Experience can be reduced to sensory elements (VAKOG).

88

Structure is more important than content.

92

The mind is a feed-forward system that predicts the future.

66



Category 1B - Premises about Communication and Change


The meaning of communication is the response elicited.

98

People have the resources for the changes they desire.

97

The system with the greatest flexibility survives.

88

If what you are doing does not work, it is useful to do something else.

97

Resistance is a signal of insufficient rapport.

86

There is no failure, only feedback.

98

All behaviour has a positive intention.

97

People make the best choices available to them.

98

If one can do it, others can learn to do it.

97

Submodalities determine the effect of an experience.

97



Category 2A - Distinctions


Sensory Modalities

100

Submodalities

100

Association versus Dissociation

100

Focus Outside versus Focus Inside

95

Analog versus Digital

93

Presupposition versus Explicit Statement versus Implication

78

Sensory experience versus Categorisation (Complex Equivalence)

90

Elements of the Structure of Subjective Experience

97

Neuro-Logical Levels

85

Meta Programs

92

Separating versus Joining

46

Graves Drives

3

Core States

68

Meta States

69



Category 2B - Attitude


Sponsoring Attitude

61

Modelling Orientation

97

COACH State

44



Category 2C - Model of Change


TOTE Model for Goal Directed Change

98

Well-Formed Outcomes

100

Utilization

97

SCORE Model for Choosing or Designing Interventions

83



Category 3A - Skills


Anchoring

98

As-if Frame

100

Calibrating Internal States and Processes

100

Clean Language

32

Double Induction

59

Ecological check

98

Eye Accessing Cues, Detecting and Working with

100

LAB Profile

63

Leading, verbal and nonverbal

95

Meta Model Questions

100

Milton Model Language Patterns

100

MindSonar MetaProfile Analysis

24

Modelling

100

Rapport (Mirroring/Pacing)

100

Stacking Realities

83

Strategies

100

Time Lines, Working with

98

Verbal Reframing

100



Category 3B - Techniques


Criteria for NLP Techniques

76

Aligning Neuro-Logical Levels Format

85

Aligning Perceptual Positions

92

Auditory Tempo Shift to change strong feelings

80

Bateson Strategy

41

Belief Audit for identifying limiting beliefs

75

Belief Outframing

73

Building Belief Bridges

46

Change Personal History

98

Changing a Strategy

98

Circle of Excellence

97

Co-Dependence Format

24

Collapsing Anchors

98

Collective Intelligence Techniques

25

Compulsion Blow Out

86

Core Finding Engine for identifying limiting beliefs

31

Core Transformation

76

Deep Tissue Massage

2

Disney Strategy

85

Dynamic Spin Release

25

Engaging the Body's Natural Processes of Healing Format

37

Eliciting a Resource, Using Communicating with the Future Self

93

Eliciting a Resource, Using a Reference Experience

97

Eliciting a Resource, Using Physiology

93

Eliciting a Resource, Using a Role Model

97

Family Constellations

5

Forgiveness Model

47

Future Pacing - Adapting a change to future contexts

100

Generative Collaboration Techniques

32

Generative Change Format

51

Godiva Chocolate Pattern

59

Grief Resolution, Shame Resolution, Guilt Resolution, Anger/Forgiveness process

73

Hero’s Journey Format

29

I-Wonder-How Technique for Generating Practical New Ideas

39

Imperative Self Format

32

Inner Child Work

22

Integrating Archetypal Energies

19

Integrating Conflicting Beliefs Format

78

mBIT - Multiple Brain Integration Techniques

5

Meta Mirror Format

68

Metaphor for inducing change

92

Negotiating Between Parts

98

New Behaviour Generator

97

Operating Metaphor

73

Provocative Change Techniques - Modelled from Frank Farrelly

36

Reimprinting Format

97

Resonance Pattern

34

Shifting the Importance of Criteria

86

Six Step Reframing

100

Social Panorama Techniques

36

Spinning Feelings to change strong feelings

54

Swish Pattern

98

Symbolic Modelling

42

Timeline Reframing Format

80

Transforming Negative Self-Talk Protocol

64

Trauma Process using V-K Dissociation

98

V-K Squash

95

Wholeness Process

37










The Elder Columns, Part III


The Results of the Survey
Preliminary Findings


Jaap Hollander, Lucas Derks, Bruce Grimley and Lisa de Rijk 

2018



Taraaah! here is the answer to ‘What is NLP?’
Maybe not the final, everlasting answer, but certainly the most authoritative answer so far.

In the Elder Columns Part I and Part II we described the arguments for defining NLP through voting and the NLP Leadership Summit group as an expert group suitable for voting. We also described the meticulous construction of ‘The List’ (the questionnaire) listing elements to vote on. You will find the whole story in these two articles: The Elder Columns Part 1 (Describing our justification for the voting process) and The Elder Columns Part 2 (Discussing the many contributions from the LS community and how they influenced the list).

The panel
The panel we ended up with had a remarkable level of NLP-expertise
All Leadership Summit members were invited to vote and 59 members did. The could vote 'Is part of NLP'/'I don't know'/'Is not part of NLP'.


Together they represent a remarkable amount of NLP-expertise. Between them, they have taught NLP for 1363 years and they have written 231 books on NLP. To our knowledge, never in the history of NLP has a group of this size, with this amount of NLP-expertise been asked to say what is NLP is and what is not.

The Delphi Method
We had been working according to the Delphi method.
As it turns out, we have been using the Delphi Method, which has these characteristics:

  1. It uses a group of participants (known as ‘panellists’) specially selected for their particular expertise on a topic.
  2. It is often conducted across a series of two or more sequential questionnaires known as ‘rounds’. It employs an initial ‘idea generation’ stage, in which panellists are asked to identify the range of salient issues.
  3. It collates ideas from Round 1 to construct the survey instrument distributed in subsequent rounds.
  4. It has an evaluation phase (third or further rounds) where panellists are provided with the panel’s responses and asked to re-evaluate their original responses.
  5. It is interested in the formation or exploration of consensus, often defined as the number of panellists agreeing with each other on questionnaire items.
  6. It is particularly useful in areas of limited research, since survey instruments and ideas are generated from a knowledgeable participant pool and it is suited to explore areas where controversy, debate or a lack of clarity exist.

As you can see from our first two articles, except for item 4, our process has adhered to the Delphi method.


Calculation

How did we calculate the results?
In our calculation, we simply used 70% yes-responses (“This is part of NLP”) as a cut off point. Within this area, we distinguished 90% and up. 


  • So the 2018 NLP Leadership Summit answer to ‘What is NLP’ is: the elements scoring 70% or more in the list below. 
  • You might say that everything scoring 90% and above is core NLP. These are set bold in the list below. In the original tables these items were given a yellow color, hence the name 'Yellow List'.
  • There are a few elements that are clearly voted as not NLP, like deep tissue massage. We took a 20% cut off for those and they are set to red in the list.
  • Elements scoring higher than 20%, but below 70% are coloured grey


We also calculated another list where the number of no-votes (“This is not part of NLP”) was subtracted from the number of yes-votes (“This is part of NLP”). If we used a 85% cut off with this formula, we were left mostly with NLP as it was in 1980.


Please note:

In this list, we show only the titles of the elements. For descriptions of the elements, please see the Elder Columns article Part 2.



Category 1A - Premises about Experience


The map is not the territory.

100

Life and mind are systemic processes.

90

Experience can be reduced to sensory elements (VAKOG).

88

Structure is more important than content.

92

The mind is a feed-forward system that predicts the future.

66



Category 1B - Premises about Communication and Change


The meaning of communication is the response elicited.

98

People have the resources for the changes they desire.

97

The system with the greatest flexibility survives.

88

If what you are doing does not work, it is useful to do something else.

97

Resistance is a signal of insufficient rapport.

86

There is no failure, only feedback.

98

All behaviour has a positive intention.

97

People make the best choices available to them.

98

If one can do it, others can learn to do it.

97

Submodalities determine the effect of an experience.

97



Category 2A - Distinctions


Sensory Modalities

100

Submodalities

100

Association versus Dissociation

100

Focus Outside versus Focus Inside

95

Analog versus Digital

93

Presupposition versus Explicit Statement versus Implication

78

Sensory experience versus Categorisation (Complex Equivalence)

90

Elements of the Structure of Subjective Experience

97

Neuro-Logical Levels

85

Meta Programs

92

Separating versus Joining

46

Graves Drives

3

Core States

68

Meta States

69



Category 2B - Attitude


Sponsoring Attitude

61

Modelling Orientation

97

COACH State

44



Category 2C - Model of Change


TOTE Model for Goal Directed Change

98

Well-Formed Outcomes

100

Utilization

97

SCORE Model for Choosing or Designing Interventions

83



Category 3A - Skills


Anchoring

98

As-if Frame

100

Calibrating Internal States and Processes

100

Clean Language

32

Double Induction

59

Ecological check

98

Eye Accessing Cues, Detecting and Working with

100

LAB Profile

63

Leading, verbal and nonverbal

95

Meta Model Questions

100

Milton Model Language Patterns

100

MindSonar MetaProfile Analysis

24

Modelling

100

Rapport (Mirroring/Pacing)

100

Stacking Realities

83

Strategies

100

Time Lines, Working with

98

Verbal Reframing

100



Category 3B - Techniques


Criteria for NLP Techniques

76

Aligning Neuro-Logical Levels Format

85

Aligning Perceptual Positions

92

Auditory Tempo Shift to change strong feelings

80

Bateson Strategy

41

Belief Audit for identifying limiting beliefs

75

Belief Outframing

73

Building Belief Bridges

46

Change Personal History

98

Changing a Strategy

98

Circle of Excellence

97

Co-Dependence Format

24

Collapsing Anchors

98

Collective Intelligence Techniques

25

Compulsion Blow Out

86

Core Finding Engine for identifying limiting beliefs

31

Core Transformation

76

Deep Tissue Massage

2

Disney Strategy

85

Dynamic Spin Release

25

Engaging the Body's Natural Processes of Healing Format

37

Eliciting a Resource, Using Communicating with the Future Self

93

Eliciting a Resource, Using a Reference Experience

97

Eliciting a Resource, Using Physiology

93

Eliciting a Resource, Using a Role Model

97

Family Constellations

5

Forgiveness Model

47

Future Pacing - Adapting a change to future contexts

100

Generative Collaboration Techniques

32

Generative Change Format

51

Godiva Chocolate Pattern

59

Grief Resolution, Shame Resolution, Guilt Resolution, Anger/Forgiveness process

73

Hero’s Journey Format

29

I-Wonder-How Technique for Generating Practical New Ideas

39

Imperative Self Format

32

Inner Child Work

22

Integrating Archetypal Energies

19

Integrating Conflicting Beliefs Format

78

mBIT - Multiple Brain Integration Techniques

5

Meta Mirror Format

68

Metaphor for inducing change

92

Negotiating Between Parts

98

New Behaviour Generator

97

Operating Metaphor

73

Provocative Change Techniques - Modelled from Frank Farrelly

36

Reimprinting Format

97

Resonance Pattern

34

Shifting the Importance of Criteria

86

Six Step Reframing

100

Social Panorama Techniques

36

Spinning Feelings to change strong feelings

54

Swish Pattern

98

Symbolic Modelling

42

Timeline Reframing Format

80

Transforming Negative Self-Talk Protocol

64

Trauma Process using V-K Dissociation

98

V-K Squash

95

Wholeness Process

37










The Elder Columns, Part III


The Results of the Survey
Preliminary Findings


Jaap Hollander, Lucas Derks, Bruce Grimley and Lisa de Rijk 

2018



Taraaah! here is the answer to ‘What is NLP?’
Maybe not the final, everlasting answer, but certainly the most authoritative answer so far.

In the Elder Columns Part I and Part II we described the arguments for defining NLP through voting and the NLP Leadership Summit group as an expert group suitable for voting. We also described the meticulous construction of ‘The List’ (the questionnaire) listing elements to vote on. You will find the whole story in these two articles: The Elder Columns Part 1 (Describing our justification for the voting process) and The Elder Columns Part 2 (Discussing the many contributions from the LS community and how they influenced the list).

The panel
The panel we ended up with had a remarkable level of NLP-expertise
All Leadership Summit members were invited to vote and 59 members did. The could vote 'Is part of NLP'/'I don't know'/'Is not part of NLP'.


Together they represent a remarkable amount of NLP-expertise. Between them, they have taught NLP for 1363 years and they have written 231 books on NLP. To our knowledge, never in the history of NLP has a group of this size, with this amount of NLP-expertise been asked to say what is NLP is and what is not.

The Delphi Method
We had been working according to the Delphi method.
As it turns out, we have been using the Delphi Method, which has these characteristics:

  1. It uses a group of participants (known as ‘panellists’) specially selected for their particular expertise on a topic.
  2. It is often conducted across a series of two or more sequential questionnaires known as ‘rounds’. It employs an initial ‘idea generation’ stage, in which panellists are asked to identify the range of salient issues.
  3. It collates ideas from Round 1 to construct the survey instrument distributed in subsequent rounds.
  4. It has an evaluation phase (third or further rounds) where panellists are provided with the panel’s responses and asked to re-evaluate their original responses.
  5. It is interested in the formation or exploration of consensus, often defined as the number of panellists agreeing with each other on questionnaire items.
  6. It is particularly useful in areas of limited research, since survey instruments and ideas are generated from a knowledgeable participant pool and it is suited to explore areas where controversy, debate or a lack of clarity exist.

As you can see from our first two articles, except for item 4, our process has adhered to the Delphi method.


Calculation

How did we calculate the results?
In our calculation, we simply used 70% yes-responses (“This is part of NLP”) as a cut off point. Within this area, we distinguished 90% and up. 


  • So the 2018 NLP Leadership Summit answer to ‘What is NLP’ is: the elements scoring 70% or more in the list below. 
  • You might say that everything scoring 90% and above is core NLP. These are set bold in the list below. In the original tables these items were given a yellow color, hence the name 'Yellow List'.
  • There are a few elements that are clearly voted as not NLP, like deep tissue massage. We took a 20% cut off for those and they are set to red in the list.
  • Elements scoring higher than 20%, but below 70% are coloured grey


We also calculated another list where the number of no-votes (“This is not part of NLP”) was subtracted from the number of yes-votes (“This is part of NLP”). If we used a 85% cut off with this formula, we were left mostly with NLP as it was in 1980.


Please note:

In this list, we show only the titles of the elements. For descriptions of the elements, please see the Elder Columns article Part 2.



Category 1A - Premises about Experience


The map is not the territory.

100

Life and mind are systemic processes.

90

Experience can be reduced to sensory elements (VAKOG).

88

Structure is more important than content.

92

The mind is a feed-forward system that predicts the future.

66



Category 1B - Premises about Communication and Change


The meaning of communication is the response elicited.

98

People have the resources for the changes they desire.

97

The system with the greatest flexibility survives.

88

If what you are doing does not work, it is useful to do something else.

97

Resistance is a signal of insufficient rapport.

86

There is no failure, only feedback.

98

All behaviour has a positive intention.

97

People make the best choices available to them.

98

If one can do it, others can learn to do it.

97

Submodalities determine the effect of an experience.

97



Category 2A - Distinctions


Sensory Modalities

100

Submodalities

100

Association versus Dissociation

100

Focus Outside versus Focus Inside

95

Analog versus Digital

93

Presupposition versus Explicit Statement versus Implication

78

Sensory experience versus Categorisation (Complex Equivalence)

90

Elements of the Structure of Subjective Experience

97

Neuro-Logical Levels

85

Meta Programs

92

Separating versus Joining

46

Graves Drives

3

Core States

68

Meta States

69



Category 2B - Attitude


Sponsoring Attitude

61

Modelling Orientation

97

COACH State

44



Category 2C - Model of Change


TOTE Model for Goal Directed Change

98

Well-Formed Outcomes

100

Utilization

97

SCORE Model for Choosing or Designing Interventions

83



Category 3A - Skills


Anchoring

98

As-if Frame

100

Calibrating Internal States and Processes

100

Clean Language

32

Double Induction

59

Ecological check

98

Eye Accessing Cues, Detecting and Working with

100

LAB Profile

63

Leading, verbal and nonverbal

95

Meta Model Questions

100

Milton Model Language Patterns

100

MindSonar MetaProfile Analysis

24

Modelling

100

Rapport (Mirroring/Pacing)

100

Stacking Realities

83

Strategies

100

Time Lines, Working with

98

Verbal Reframing

100



Category 3B - Techniques


Criteria for NLP Techniques

76

Aligning Neuro-Logical Levels Format

85

Aligning Perceptual Positions

92

Auditory Tempo Shift to change strong feelings

80

Bateson Strategy

41

Belief Audit for identifying limiting beliefs

75

Belief Outframing

73

Building Belief Bridges

46

Change Personal History

98

Changing a Strategy

98

Circle of Excellence

97

Co-Dependence Format

24

Collapsing Anchors

98

Collective Intelligence Techniques

25

Compulsion Blow Out

86

Core Finding Engine for identifying limiting beliefs

31

Core Transformation

76

Deep Tissue Massage

2

Disney Strategy

85

Dynamic Spin Release

25

Engaging the Body's Natural Processes of Healing Format

37

Eliciting a Resource, Using Communicating with the Future Self

93

Eliciting a Resource, Using a Reference Experience

97

Eliciting a Resource, Using Physiology

93

Eliciting a Resource, Using a Role Model

97

Family Constellations

5

Forgiveness Model

47

Future Pacing - Adapting a change to future contexts

100

Generative Collaboration Techniques

32

Generative Change Format

51

Godiva Chocolate Pattern

59

Grief Resolution, Shame Resolution, Guilt Resolution, Anger/Forgiveness process

73

Hero’s Journey Format

29

I-Wonder-How Technique for Generating Practical New Ideas

39

Imperative Self Format

32

Inner Child Work

22

Integrating Archetypal Energies

19

Integrating Conflicting Beliefs Format

78

mBIT - Multiple Brain Integration Techniques

5

Meta Mirror Format

68

Metaphor for inducing change

92

Negotiating Between Parts

98

New Behaviour Generator

97

Operating Metaphor

73

Provocative Change Techniques - Modelled from Frank Farrelly

36

Reimprinting Format

97

Resonance Pattern

34

Shifting the Importance of Criteria

86

Six Step Reframing

100

Social Panorama Techniques

36

Spinning Feelings to change strong feelings

54

Swish Pattern

98

Symbolic Modelling

42

Timeline Reframing Format

80

Transforming Negative Self-Talk Protocol

64

Trauma Process using V-K Dissociation

98

V-K Squash

95

Wholeness Process

37









About the Author Jaap Hollander

Psycholoog, NLP-trainer, Trainer provocatief coachen, schrijver (11 boeken), directeur IEP --- Geeft NLP- en provocatieve workshops en -opleidingen. --- Stond vijf jaar achtereen in de top-500 professionals van ‘Quote’. --- Ontwikkelde MindSonar.

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